18th century, Science

Labour Pains: Elizabeth Nihell and the Struggle to Champion Female Midwifery

by Frankee Bryant Concerns about the medicalization of childbirth and struggles to maintain ‘normality’ in labour have been at the forefront of debate within the discipline of midwifery since the 1980s. The achievements of modern medicine, with their undeniable benefits, have given rise to new challenges for midwives trying to maintain normality and prevent unnecessary… Continue reading Labour Pains: Elizabeth Nihell and the Struggle to Champion Female Midwifery

19th century, 20th century, Science

A Life in the Stars: Henrietta Swan Leavitt

 by Estelle Cheuk  The remarkable mind who pushed the limitations of her time to make outstanding contributions to the field of astronomy Although largely unknown outside the fields of astronomy and astro-physics, Henrietta Swan Leavitt, made one of the most important and pioneering discoveries of the disciplines to date. Her findings turned the contemporary view… Continue reading A Life in the Stars: Henrietta Swan Leavitt

18th century, 19th century, 20th century, Science

Scientific Women: Finding ‘a way in’ through the centuries

By Professor Ruth Watts.Science, a vast field of knowledge so important in the modern world, has traditionally been perceived as ‘masculine’, and women have generally been excluded or pushed to the periphery. Modern studies have explored the reasons for this and have found many examples of women who managed to break through the barriers. The… Continue reading Scientific Women: Finding ‘a way in’ through the centuries

Contemporary, Interviews, Science

Project Juno: Trudy Coe and Women in Physics

Click here to read the extended version of this interview. Gaia Donati talks to Trudy Coe, Project Juno Officer in the Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 26th January 2011. I am very grateful to Carrie Leonard-McIntyre for putting me in touch with Trudy Coe, who is currently working for the Department of Physics at the University… Continue reading Project Juno: Trudy Coe and Women in Physics

17th century, Arts, Science

“An Inexhaustible Treasure of Fancy”: Thomas Sprat, Margaret Cavendish and Aphra Behn.

By Aime Williams During the mid- seventeenth century, there arose a new strand of philosophical thinking -- the premise of which was that truth had been encoded into the world by God through his creation. The best way to find these truths, therefore, was to examine the world via observation and the senses. The central text… Continue reading “An Inexhaustible Treasure of Fancy”: Thomas Sprat, Margaret Cavendish and Aphra Behn.

20th century, Science

Jane Goodall

By Harriet Dalrymple. Jane Goodall is one of the most famous, celebrated and inspirational figures in Science today, however it is not only her academic work that has made her so successful. Few scientists have the charisma needed to entertain the public on TV quiz shows, and win round comedians such as Jon Stewart. Her… Continue reading Jane Goodall

20th century, Science

Rosalind Franklin

By Chloe McIvor Rosalind Franklin was a British scientist who made one of the most important discoveries of the twentieth century. Her work on X-ray diffraction images of DNA is responsible for her fame after death but she is renowned for being unappreciated in life. She is now recognised for playing an important role in… Continue reading Rosalind Franklin

20th century, Science

Emmy Noether

'The most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began’ By Jessica Hanzlik The story of Amalie “Emmy” Noether parallels that of countless women, who, throughout generations and across cultures, were denied access to knowledge solely on the basis of their sex.  Noether, however, leaves behind her not just… Continue reading Emmy Noether

19th century, Science

‘I do like a contest with the bigwigs’: How Mary Anning Struck Scientific Gold

By Jack Coombs Mary Anning is a name little known, even in the fields of palaeontology, and geology, which she so influenced. Born in 1799 in Lyme Regis, Dorset, she was conveniently placed, both in an era when these early sciences were set to undergo a renaissance of advancement, and beside a three-mile long stretch… Continue reading ‘I do like a contest with the bigwigs’: How Mary Anning Struck Scientific Gold