18th century, Humanities

Louise Dupin: Bluestocking’s 18th Century Predecessor

By Sophie Dowle. Long before Bluestocking Journal was publishing articles on great women, Louise Marie-Madeleine Dupin (1706-99), a French saloniste, compiled and began writing a book on the history of women: Ouvrage sur les femmes. Unfortunately, this work was never fully completed, and the many boxes of notes, drafts and copies that Madame Dupin had… Continue reading Louise Dupin: Bluestocking’s 18th Century Predecessor

18th century, Arts

‘Nature is the nurse of sentiment’: Mary Wollstonecraft’s Scandinavian Travelogue

By Alice Theobald So much more than an exercise in travel writing, Mary Wollstonecraft’s Letters Written During a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark accounts her unrequited love for her supposed partner, Gilbert Imlay. Reading more like a tragedy in epistolary form, Wollstonecraft’s account of the landscape is interwoven with personal reflections on her… Continue reading ‘Nature is the nurse of sentiment’: Mary Wollstonecraft’s Scandinavian Travelogue

18th century, Humanities

Striking Out New Paths: Late Eighteenth Century Women Travel Writers and ‘Philosophic Geography’

By Will Tullett, “... the world should see, to how much better purpose the LADIES travel than their LORDS; and that, whilst it is surfeited with Male-Travels, all in the same tone, and stuft with the same trifles; a lady has the skill to strike out a new path, and to embellish a worn-out subject,… Continue reading Striking Out New Paths: Late Eighteenth Century Women Travel Writers and ‘Philosophic Geography’

18th century, Science

Labour Pains: Elizabeth Nihell and the Struggle to Champion Female Midwifery

by Frankee Bryant Concerns about the medicalization of childbirth and struggles to maintain ‘normality’ in labour have been at the forefront of debate within the discipline of midwifery since the 1980s. The achievements of modern medicine, with their undeniable benefits, have given rise to new challenges for midwives trying to maintain normality and prevent unnecessary… Continue reading Labour Pains: Elizabeth Nihell and the Struggle to Champion Female Midwifery

18th century, 19th century, 20th century, Science

Scientific Women: Finding ‘a way in’ through the centuries

By Professor Ruth Watts.Science, a vast field of knowledge so important in the modern world, has traditionally been perceived as ‘masculine’, and women have generally been excluded or pushed to the periphery. Modern studies have explored the reasons for this and have found many examples of women who managed to break through the barriers. The… Continue reading Scientific Women: Finding ‘a way in’ through the centuries

18th century, Arts

Public and Private, Real and Fictional: The Rise of Women’s Letter-Writing in the Eighteenth Century

By Tess Somervell.During the eighteenth century, thanks to the establishment of the post office in 1660, a rise in literacy, and an ascendant ‘middle class’, letter-writing became an increasingly common pastime for men and women. The letter became a form both of private communication and of public expression, in which women were expected not only… Continue reading Public and Private, Real and Fictional: The Rise of Women’s Letter-Writing in the Eighteenth Century

18th century, 20th century, Arts

‘Laetitia Pilkington’ by Virginia Woolf

By Virginia Woolf This article was first published Woolf's 'The Common Reader' in 1925. Let us bother the librarian once again. Let us ask him to reach down, dust, and hand over to us that little brown book over there, the Memoirs of Mrs. Pilkington, three volumes bound in one, printed by Peter Hoey in… Continue reading ‘Laetitia Pilkington’ by Virginia Woolf

18th century, Arts

Mary Montagu

By Ella Harris Lady Mary Montagu (1689-1762), court beauty, wife of the British Ambassador to Istanbul and prolific letter-writer, was the first major female travel writer of her time. She was a correspondent with Alexander Pope, knew and was disliked by Horace Walpole, and introduced the Turkish, then Ottoman, method of inoculation to Britain. Often… Continue reading Mary Montagu

18th century, Science

Emilie du Chatelet: The Multi-Tasking Marquise

By Mohsin Khan Emilie du Chatelet, regarded for too long as a footnote of history being a mistress of Voltaire, was a driven and passionate physicist, mathematician and translator. She derived the equation for kinetic energy by studying the work of Leibniz and created the only existing French translation of Newton's Principia. Du Chatelet's scientific… Continue reading Emilie du Chatelet: The Multi-Tasking Marquise

18th century, Humanities

Olympe de Gouges and the Rights of Woman

By Lloyd Lewis In March 2004, in a modest ceremony followed by a buffet, a previously unnamed crossroads in Paris was named 'Place Olympe de Gouges'. Throughout France, a small but growing number of roads bear the same name; all were inaugurated within the last thirty years, Gouges died in 1793. The campaign to rehabilitate… Continue reading Olympe de Gouges and the Rights of Woman