20th century, Humanities

Alice Vanderbilt Morris: Interlingua and the case for a Global Language

By Verity Heir The need for interlanguage As the world became increasingly more international in the twentieth century, with the rise of technology and more transportation options, there became a demand for a common language so that nations could communicate effectively without the use of translators. To solve this linguistic conundrum, individuals such as Alice… Continue reading Alice Vanderbilt Morris: Interlingua and the case for a Global Language

Humanities

Making the Marginal the Pivotal: The importance of writing maritime history from a ‘gender perspective’

By Marianna Massa “… women, that group that was supposed to be on the land, sailed the sea in a variety of ways”. -          Jo Stanley  In the making – and writing – of history, women’s contributions have been overlooked. It is the same case in maritime history. Women have been the ones left behind… Continue reading Making the Marginal the Pivotal: The importance of writing maritime history from a ‘gender perspective’

20th century, Humanities

A Forgotten Contribution: Women and the Home Guard

by Andrew Seaton,  The Home Guard, set up in May 1940, was a voluntary defence force in the Second World War tasked with being the first bulwark against an invading German army. In a broadcast on the 14th May, Anthony Eden, the government figure who initiated the Home Guard - Or the ‘Local Defence Volunteers’… Continue reading A Forgotten Contribution: Women and the Home Guard

20th century, Humanities

Mediating images of conflict: Muriel Paget, gender and philanthropy in the interwar years

By Eve Colpus, When philanthropist, society hostess and international celebrity Muriel Paget died in 1938, her Times obituary described her as ‘the second lady of the lamp’.[1] It was a purposive label, calling to mind another philanthropist and more famous lady of the lamp, Florence Nightingale. In the first instance the comparison was justified at… Continue reading Mediating images of conflict: Muriel Paget, gender and philanthropy in the interwar years

18th century, Humanities

Striking Out New Paths: Late Eighteenth Century Women Travel Writers and ‘Philosophic Geography’

By Will Tullett, “... the world should see, to how much better purpose the LADIES travel than their LORDS; and that, whilst it is surfeited with Male-Travels, all in the same tone, and stuft with the same trifles; a lady has the skill to strike out a new path, and to embellish a worn-out subject,… Continue reading Striking Out New Paths: Late Eighteenth Century Women Travel Writers and ‘Philosophic Geography’

Arts, Humanities, Medieval

Peace, Politics, Gender and God: Beowulf and the Women Of Early Medieval Europe

By Eleanor Franzen Beowulf is not what one might call a feminine poem. The women whose lives and sufferings are described within it are not the immediate focus. No one thinks of the agony of Hildeburh or the canny political maneuverings of Wealhtheow when they think of Beowulf. The Beowulf-poet, particularly in his exploitation and… Continue reading Peace, Politics, Gender and God: Beowulf and the Women Of Early Medieval Europe

19th century, Humanities

A Life’s Work: Minnie James and Images of the Woman Librarian

By Mona Sakr Minnie Stewart Rhodes James (1865 – 1903) was appointed Head Librarian in the People’s Palace Library, East London in 1889. She was a respected member of the Library Association, and presented a number of papers to the Association, some of which discussed opportunities for women to take up paid positions in libraries.… Continue reading A Life’s Work: Minnie James and Images of the Woman Librarian

19th century, Arts, Humanities

Education and Social Change in George Eliot’s Middlemarch

By M. S. Lovelace The rapid educational and social developments of the late 19th century were underpinned not just by policy and public documentation but by the 'unrecorded but resourceful improvisations’ (Donald, 1992, p. 2) of the everyday. The latter occur in the physical spaces in which education operates and these spaces and improvisations can… Continue reading Education and Social Change in George Eliot’s Middlemarch

20th century, Contemporary, Humanities

Elinor Ostrom and Economic Governance

By Eleanor Connolly. This year Elinor Ostrom became the first ever female recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences. Ostrom's win was revolutionary for her gender, but more importantly because the research she was awarded for has overturned commonly held assumptions about basic human economic interaction. The prize was shared Oliver E. Williamson for… Continue reading Elinor Ostrom and Economic Governance

Humanities, Medieval

Saint Clare of Assisi – living by the Rule

By Raffaella Tommassi. Clare of Assisi can be seen as one of the most influential women in the Middle Ages, at the forefront of the fight to ensure a true female religious mendicancy. Indeed, Pope Innocent IV agreed with me, stopping the Friars Minor from saying the office of the dead during her funeral and… Continue reading Saint Clare of Assisi – living by the Rule