20th century, Humanities

Mamie Phipps Clark: Psychologist and Activist

By Tilly Nevin. Today we look out upon an America divided internally, an America in which racism does not appear the distant memory that it should. Mamie Phipps Clark saw a much more visceral manifestation of such racial divisions: segregation in schools, in the workplace, in public. Phipps Clark studied the impact that segregation had… Continue reading Mamie Phipps Clark: Psychologist and Activist

20th century, Humanities, Interviews

An Interview with June Purvis: The Demonisation of the Suffragettes

By Sophie Dowle. I remember being fascinated by the suffragettes from a young age, devouring the ‘My Story’ book about a girl who joins the movement, and reading as many books as I could get my hands on (that weren’t beyond an eight-year-old’s reading ability). Something struck me about the narratives I was reading; the… Continue reading An Interview with June Purvis: The Demonisation of the Suffragettes

18th century, Humanities

Louise Dupin: Bluestocking’s 18th Century Predecessor

By Sophie Dowle. Long before Bluestocking Journal was publishing articles on great women, Louise Marie-Madeleine Dupin (1706-99), a French saloniste, compiled and began writing a book on the history of women: Ouvrage sur les femmes. Unfortunately, this work was never fully completed, and the many boxes of notes, drafts and copies that Madame Dupin had… Continue reading Louise Dupin: Bluestocking’s 18th Century Predecessor

17th century, Humanities, Science

Counterpart Lives: Margaret Cavendish and Lady Anne Conway

By Alice Theobald Margaret Cavendish is chiefly remembered today for being the pioneer of the science-fiction genre with her innovative work The Blazing-World of 1666. However, she also wrote prolifically on political and philosophical matters, championing a pioneering materialism and progressive method of natural philosophy. Published in the same year as her fictional work, Cavendish’s… Continue reading Counterpart Lives: Margaret Cavendish and Lady Anne Conway

16th century, Humanities

Elizabeth: The First Things to Remember

By Anna Simpson The reign of Elizabeth I was undeniably a politically tumultuous and dynamic one. Embroiled in romantic, diplomatic and bloody foreign battles, Elizabeth died leaving her successors to pick up the pieces of her debt-filled and heir-less legacy. It may therefore seem surprising that she continues to be celebrated in most modern day… Continue reading Elizabeth: The First Things to Remember

19th century, 20th century, Humanities

Beatrice Webb: Progressive Politics and a Pragmatic Outlook on War

By Alice Theobald Beatrice Webb – co-founder of the London School of Economics – had a notoriously pragmatic approach to social affairs, coining the term ‘collective bargaining’ to describe the relationship between employers and employees negotiating working conditions. Cousin to social philanthropist Charles Booth, Webb immersed herself in aiding his research on Victorian urban slums… Continue reading Beatrice Webb: Progressive Politics and a Pragmatic Outlook on War

Humanities, Interviews

Interview with Professor Martha Nussbaum

Alice Theobald interviews Martha Nussbaum American Philosopher Martha Nussbaum is the current Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics, appointed in the Law School and the Philosophy Department at the University of Chicago.  She has previously taught at Harvard, Brown and Oxford. She has also chaired the Committee on the Status of Women,… Continue reading Interview with Professor Martha Nussbaum

20th century, Humanities

A Life Less Ordinary: Emmeline Pankhurst’s Fight for Equality

By Ellen Wright Emmeline Pankhurst’s life is largely studied in the context of the fight for women’s suffrage in the early 20th century; however, she in fact had a much wider spread of interests and campaigns. By defining Emmeline solely as the leader of the suffragette movement, we are limiting the ways in which she… Continue reading A Life Less Ordinary: Emmeline Pankhurst’s Fight for Equality

20th century, Humanities

Alice Vanderbilt Morris: Interlingua and the case for a Global Language

By Verity Heir The need for interlanguage As the world became increasingly more international in the twentieth century, with the rise of technology and more transportation options, there became a demand for a common language so that nations could communicate effectively without the use of translators. To solve this linguistic conundrum, individuals such as Alice… Continue reading Alice Vanderbilt Morris: Interlingua and the case for a Global Language

Humanities

Making the Marginal the Pivotal: The importance of writing maritime history from a ‘gender perspective’

By Marianna Massa “… women, that group that was supposed to be on the land, sailed the sea in a variety of ways”. -          Jo Stanley  In the making – and writing – of history, women’s contributions have been overlooked. It is the same case in maritime history. Women have been the ones left behind… Continue reading Making the Marginal the Pivotal: The importance of writing maritime history from a ‘gender perspective’