Latest Entries
Louise Dupin: Bluestocking’s 18th Century Predecessor
18th century / Humanities

Louise Dupin: Bluestocking’s 18th Century Predecessor

By Sophie Dowle. Long before Bluestocking Journal was publishing articles on great women, Louise Marie-Madeleine Dupin (1706-99), a French saloniste, compiled and began writing a book on the history of women: Ouvrage sur les femmes. Unfortunately, this work was never fully completed, and the many boxes of notes, drafts and copies that Madame Dupin had … Continue reading

A Conversation with Emily Temple-Wood
Interviews / Science

A Conversation with Emily Temple-Wood

Ellen Pasternack talks to Emily Temple-Wood, Wikipedia editor and founder of the Women in Science wikiproject. Emily Temple-Wood, an undergraduate biology student at Loyola University Chicago, has been editing Wikipedia articles since she was 12. In 2012, she found out that several women who had been fellows of the Royal Society did not have Wikipedia articles. ‘That … Continue reading

Counterpart Lives: Margaret Cavendish and Lady Anne Conway
17th century / Humanities / Science

Counterpart Lives: Margaret Cavendish and Lady Anne Conway

By Alice Theobald Margaret Cavendish is chiefly remembered today for being the pioneer of the science-fiction genre with her innovative work The Blazing-World of 1666. However, she also wrote prolifically on political and philosophical matters, championing a pioneering materialism and progressive method of natural philosophy. Published in the same year as her fictional work, Cavendish’s … Continue reading

A Renaissance Flâneur: Isabella Whitney’s willed urban self
16th century / Arts

A Renaissance Flâneur: Isabella Whitney’s willed urban self

By Alice Theobald In executing a fictional will, sixteenth-century poet Isabella Whitney not only presented a defence of women’s legal legitimacy but also externalised herself into the city, channelling her personal impulses into the physical structures and material goods of her London. However, rather than reducing herself to a commodity, she uses her distribution of … Continue reading

‘Nature is the nurse of sentiment’: Mary Wollstonecraft’s Scandinavian Travelogue
18th century / Arts

‘Nature is the nurse of sentiment’: Mary Wollstonecraft’s Scandinavian Travelogue

By Alice Theobald So much more than an exercise in travel writing, Mary Wollstonecraft’s Letters Written During a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark accounts her unrequited love for her supposed partner, Gilbert Imlay. Reading more like a tragedy in epistolary form, Wollstonecraft’s account of the landscape is interwoven with personal reflections on her … Continue reading

Beatrice Webb: Progressive Politics and a Pragmatic Outlook on War
19th century / 20th century / Humanities

Beatrice Webb: Progressive Politics and a Pragmatic Outlook on War

By Alice Theobald Beatrice Webb – co-founder of the London School of Economics – had a notoriously pragmatic approach to social affairs, coining the term ‘collective bargaining’ to describe the relationship between employers and employees negotiating working conditions. Cousin to social philanthropist Charles Booth, Webb immersed herself in aiding his research on Victorian urban slums … Continue reading