20th century, Arts

Silent Witnesses: The Art of Frauke Eigen and Jenny Stolzenberg

 by Hannah Lee Walk into the Imperial War Museum’s current exhibition on women war artists and you are greeted by the determined face of Ruby Loftus engaged in the expert task of screwing a breech ring. The portrait was painted in 1943, in the gun factory where she worked, by the war artist Laura Knight.… Continue reading Silent Witnesses: The Art of Frauke Eigen and Jenny Stolzenberg

20th century, Arts, Contemporary

Finding an inner voice through outer expression in the music of Meredith Monk

By George Chambers "Sometimes in the past when I was going to perform a piece again I would listen to old recordings and try to reproduce the material. This time I realized that carrying around old information, trying to get everything in, and still be in the moment just doesn't work."  Meredith Monk The compositional… Continue reading Finding an inner voice through outer expression in the music of Meredith Monk

20th century, Humanities

A Forgotten Contribution: Women and the Home Guard

by Andrew Seaton,  The Home Guard, set up in May 1940, was a voluntary defence force in the Second World War tasked with being the first bulwark against an invading German army. In a broadcast on the 14th May, Anthony Eden, the government figure who initiated the Home Guard - Or the ‘Local Defence Volunteers’… Continue reading A Forgotten Contribution: Women and the Home Guard

20th century, Humanities

Mediating images of conflict: Muriel Paget, gender and philanthropy in the interwar years

By Eve Colpus, When philanthropist, society hostess and international celebrity Muriel Paget died in 1938, her Times obituary described her as ‘the second lady of the lamp’.[1] It was a purposive label, calling to mind another philanthropist and more famous lady of the lamp, Florence Nightingale. In the first instance the comparison was justified at… Continue reading Mediating images of conflict: Muriel Paget, gender and philanthropy in the interwar years

19th century, 20th century, Science

A Life in the Stars: Henrietta Swan Leavitt

 by Estelle Cheuk  The remarkable mind who pushed the limitations of her time to make outstanding contributions to the field of astronomy Although largely unknown outside the fields of astronomy and astro-physics, Henrietta Swan Leavitt, made one of the most important and pioneering discoveries of the disciplines to date. Her findings turned the contemporary view… Continue reading A Life in the Stars: Henrietta Swan Leavitt

18th century, 19th century, 20th century, Science

Scientific Women: Finding ‘a way in’ through the centuries

By Professor Ruth Watts.Science, a vast field of knowledge so important in the modern world, has traditionally been perceived as ‘masculine’, and women have generally been excluded or pushed to the periphery. Modern studies have explored the reasons for this and have found many examples of women who managed to break through the barriers. The… Continue reading Scientific Women: Finding ‘a way in’ through the centuries

19th century, 20th century, Interviews

Recovering Lost Voices: An Interview with Professor Jane Martin

 Click here to read the extended version of this interview.   On behalf of Bluestocking, Ali Nihat interviewed Professor Jane Martin, of the Institute of Education in London, whose work focuses on the relation between education and politics. Professor Martin spoke to us about her recently published work Making Socialists: Mary Bridges Adams and the Fight… Continue reading Recovering Lost Voices: An Interview with Professor Jane Martin

20th century, Arts

Uncomfortable Quadrangles: Communities of Women in the Inter-War Oxford Novel

By C. Stopa-HuntIn her novel The Dark Tide (1923), Vera Brittain pillories her best friend and fellow Somervillian, Winifred Holtby. The first half of the novel is set in a women’s college in Oxford, but “Drayton” a Somerville surrogate fails to cure Daphne Lethbridge, the figure based on Holtby, of “a mental immaturity that was… Continue reading Uncomfortable Quadrangles: Communities of Women in the Inter-War Oxford Novel

20th century, Arts

Golden Notebook, golden ladies? Image and self-image in Doris Lessing’s unwilling ’feminist Bible’.

By Monika Kreile That heroines of The Golden Notebook (first published in 1962i) are not paradigms of ’liberated’ women is an often-stated fact in criticisms of the novel. However, to ponder whether, and to what extent, the weaknesses of her heroines are intentionally inserted by Lessing or reflect Lessing's own state of feminist (un)consciousness is… Continue reading Golden Notebook, golden ladies? Image and self-image in Doris Lessing’s unwilling ’feminist Bible’.

18th century, 20th century, Arts

‘Laetitia Pilkington’ by Virginia Woolf

By Virginia Woolf This article was first published Woolf's 'The Common Reader' in 1925. Let us bother the librarian once again. Let us ask him to reach down, dust, and hand over to us that little brown book over there, the Memoirs of Mrs. Pilkington, three volumes bound in one, printed by Peter Hoey in… Continue reading ‘Laetitia Pilkington’ by Virginia Woolf