Arts, Contemporary, Interviews

A Conversation With Playwright Flo Read

By Emily Oldham. Since Flo Read’s Twin Primes won Best Script and Best Production in the 2015 Oxford New Writing Festival, she has gone on to develop several more acclaimed plays. Her work has been performed both nationally and internationally, including at the Edinburgh Fringe 2015 and 2016. She recently graduated from Oxford University with… Continue reading A Conversation With Playwright Flo Read

18th century, Arts

Public and Private, Real and Fictional: The Rise of Women’s Letter-Writing in the Eighteenth Century

By Tess Somervell.During the eighteenth century, thanks to the establishment of the post office in 1660, a rise in literacy, and an ascendant ‘middle class’, letter-writing became an increasingly common pastime for men and women. The letter became a form both of private communication and of public expression, in which women were expected not only… Continue reading Public and Private, Real and Fictional: The Rise of Women’s Letter-Writing in the Eighteenth Century

20th century, Arts

Golden Notebook, golden ladies? Image and self-image in Doris Lessing’s unwilling ’feminist Bible’.

By Monika Kreile That heroines of The Golden Notebook (first published in 1962i) are not paradigms of ’liberated’ women is an often-stated fact in criticisms of the novel. However, to ponder whether, and to what extent, the weaknesses of her heroines are intentionally inserted by Lessing or reflect Lessing's own state of feminist (un)consciousness is… Continue reading Golden Notebook, golden ladies? Image and self-image in Doris Lessing’s unwilling ’feminist Bible’.

Arts, Contemporary

Kate Mosse: the other Kate

By Clarissa Pabi. Kate Mosse may not canter down catwalks like the other Kate, but she is a model of great importance nonetheless.  A BBC broadcaster, best-selling author, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, co-founder of the “Orange Prize for Fiction” and the “Chichester Writing Festival”, Kate’s contributions to the arts go on ad infinitum. … Continue reading Kate Mosse: the other Kate

20th century, Humanities

Virginia Woolf and the search for A Room of One’s Own

By Joanna Kieschnick Virginia Woolf is celebrated for her innovative modernist novels, particularly Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, and The Waves. However, her essays are often overlooked. As a woman writer, Woolf was passionate about proving that women were just as creative and intelligent as men and equally capable of producing quality writing. Woolf often… Continue reading Virginia Woolf and the search for A Room of One’s Own

20th century, Arts

Ingeborg Bachmann’s Malina: The (im)Possibility of Writing the Female Self

By Alexandra Hills The cultic tradition of German literary scholarship overlooks its few female exponents shadowed by inescapable male heavyweights of Germanistik. To toe the standard line, women in German literature are often limited to playing a supporting role to the eminent male genius whose ineluctable influence decides their fate, Goethe's Gretchen for example. Ingeborg… Continue reading Ingeborg Bachmann’s Malina: The (im)Possibility of Writing the Female Self

Arts, Classical/ Ancient

“Keep your whore with her wool baskets!”: Sulpicia answers back

By Susannah Darby Roman elegy was a very one-sided conversation. Male poets would write to women, both in praise, and in criticism, of them. Although they demanded that their girlfriends be “doctae puellae”, educated girls, and although Sappho was celebrated as the Ninth Muse, we rarely hear the other side of the story. Many, if… Continue reading “Keep your whore with her wool baskets!”: Sulpicia answers back