19th century, 20th century, Humanities, Interviews

A Conversation with Jane Robinson on Bluestockings

Ellen Pasternack talks to Jane Robinson about her book, Bluestockings: A Remarkable History of the First Women to Fight for an Education. Jane Robinson’s  Bluestockings paints a story of small victories, of a series of women who each managed to get her foot in the door and leave it open a little wider for those… Continue reading A Conversation with Jane Robinson on Bluestockings

18th century, Arts

‘Nature is the nurse of sentiment’: Mary Wollstonecraft’s Scandinavian Travelogue

By Alice Theobald So much more than an exercise in travel writing, Mary Wollstonecraft’s Letters Written During a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark accounts her unrequited love for her supposed partner, Gilbert Imlay. Reading more like a tragedy in epistolary form, Wollstonecraft’s account of the landscape is interwoven with personal reflections on her… Continue reading ‘Nature is the nurse of sentiment’: Mary Wollstonecraft’s Scandinavian Travelogue

20th century, Humanities

A Life Less Ordinary: Emmeline Pankhurst’s Fight for Equality

By Ellen Wright Emmeline Pankhurst’s life is largely studied in the context of the fight for women’s suffrage in the early 20th century; however, she in fact had a much wider spread of interests and campaigns. By defining Emmeline solely as the leader of the suffragette movement, we are limiting the ways in which she… Continue reading A Life Less Ordinary: Emmeline Pankhurst’s Fight for Equality

18th century, Science

Labour Pains: Elizabeth Nihell and the Struggle to Champion Female Midwifery

by Frankee Bryant Concerns about the medicalization of childbirth and struggles to maintain ‘normality’ in labour have been at the forefront of debate within the discipline of midwifery since the 1980s. The achievements of modern medicine, with their undeniable benefits, have given rise to new challenges for midwives trying to maintain normality and prevent unnecessary… Continue reading Labour Pains: Elizabeth Nihell and the Struggle to Champion Female Midwifery

18th century, Humanities

Olympe de Gouges and the Rights of Woman

By Lloyd Lewis In March 2004, in a modest ceremony followed by a buffet, a previously unnamed crossroads in Paris was named 'Place Olympe de Gouges'. Throughout France, a small but growing number of roads bear the same name; all were inaugurated within the last thirty years, Gouges died in 1793. The campaign to rehabilitate… Continue reading Olympe de Gouges and the Rights of Woman