Arts, Contemporary

Doris Salcedo’s Untitleds

By Emily Oldham. Picture a room: spacious, with blank-white walls, it seems the height of impersonality. From this coldness loom dozens of furniture pieces, every crevice suffused by cement, figures of unapologetically brutal beauty. Some contain embedded hair, bone and even clothing. The absence of a body becomes starkly physical; concrete seeps into every inch of… Continue reading Doris Salcedo’s Untitleds

19th century, 20th century, Humanities

Beatrice Webb: Progressive Politics and a Pragmatic Outlook on War

By Alice Theobald Beatrice Webb – co-founder of the London School of Economics – had a notoriously pragmatic approach to social affairs, coining the term ‘collective bargaining’ to describe the relationship between employers and employees negotiating working conditions. Cousin to social philanthropist Charles Booth, Webb immersed herself in aiding his research on Victorian urban slums… Continue reading Beatrice Webb: Progressive Politics and a Pragmatic Outlook on War

20th century, Humanities

A Life Less Ordinary: Emmeline Pankhurst’s Fight for Equality

By Ellen Wright Emmeline Pankhurst’s life is largely studied in the context of the fight for women’s suffrage in the early 20th century; however, she in fact had a much wider spread of interests and campaigns. By defining Emmeline solely as the leader of the suffragette movement, we are limiting the ways in which she… Continue reading A Life Less Ordinary: Emmeline Pankhurst’s Fight for Equality

20th century, Arts

Silent Witnesses: The Art of Frauke Eigen and Jenny Stolzenberg

 by Hannah Lee Walk into the Imperial War Museum’s current exhibition on women war artists and you are greeted by the determined face of Ruby Loftus engaged in the expert task of screwing a breech ring. The portrait was painted in 1943, in the gun factory where she worked, by the war artist Laura Knight.… Continue reading Silent Witnesses: The Art of Frauke Eigen and Jenny Stolzenberg

20th century, Humanities

A Forgotten Contribution: Women and the Home Guard

by Andrew Seaton,  The Home Guard, set up in May 1940, was a voluntary defence force in the Second World War tasked with being the first bulwark against an invading German army. In a broadcast on the 14th May, Anthony Eden, the government figure who initiated the Home Guard - Or the ‘Local Defence Volunteers’… Continue reading A Forgotten Contribution: Women and the Home Guard

Arts, Classical/ Ancient

No Sex, Please, We’re Hellenic: Female Solidarity in the Lysistrata

By Chris Noon.  The Greek world in the last quarter of the fifth century BC was dominated by the Peloponnesian War (431-404), waged between Athens and Sparta, arguably the two most powerful city-states of the day. The literary sources documenting the war are, perhaps unsurprisingly, entirely androcentric. Women are all but absent from Thucydides’ account;… Continue reading No Sex, Please, We’re Hellenic: Female Solidarity in the Lysistrata

20th century, Arts

Uncomfortable Quadrangles: Communities of Women in the Inter-War Oxford Novel

By C. Stopa-HuntIn her novel The Dark Tide (1923), Vera Brittain pillories her best friend and fellow Somervillian, Winifred Holtby. The first half of the novel is set in a women’s college in Oxford, but “Drayton” a Somerville surrogate fails to cure Daphne Lethbridge, the figure based on Holtby, of “a mental immaturity that was… Continue reading Uncomfortable Quadrangles: Communities of Women in the Inter-War Oxford Novel

20th century, Arts

Birth and Descent: An Intimate Critique of Loy’s Poem ‘Der Blinde Junge’

By Mona Sakr A short grapple with Google demonstrates that, if nothing else, Mina Loy has earned herself a phenomenally large set of labels. She was (according to the internet) a modernist, a postmodernist, a futurist, a conceptualist and a surrealist all at the same time. It sounds impressive. Confusing also, for I cannot seem… Continue reading Birth and Descent: An Intimate Critique of Loy’s Poem ‘Der Blinde Junge’