16th century, Humanities

Elizabeth: The First Things to Remember

By Anna Simpson The reign of Elizabeth I was undeniably a politically tumultuous and dynamic one. Embroiled in romantic, diplomatic and bloody foreign battles, Elizabeth died leaving her successors to pick up the pieces of her debt-filled and heir-less legacy. It may therefore seem surprising that she continues to be celebrated in most modern day… Continue reading Elizabeth: The First Things to Remember

19th century, Arts

An Unwilling Empress: Sisi through the lens of her poetry and the portraits of Franz Xaver Winterhalter

By Alice Theobald Termed by Brigitte Hamann ‘a woman who refused to behave according to her rank’, Empress Sisi’s somewhat playful audacity was always at odds with the official role of Empress of Austria she assumed at the tender age of sixteen. Her childhood spent at Possenhofen Castle fostered an unrestrained environment with few rules… Continue reading An Unwilling Empress: Sisi through the lens of her poetry and the portraits of Franz Xaver Winterhalter

16th century, Humanities

Women Historians and Female Kingship in Early Modern England

By Signy Gutnick Allen Jane. Edward. Mary. Elizabeth. By the end of Elizabeth I's reign the population of England was practically, if not philosophically or ideologically, very used to having a woman on the throne. However, what living under a female monarch for an Early Modern population was actually like, from how 'female kings' were… Continue reading Women Historians and Female Kingship in Early Modern England

16th century, Arts

A Woman Scorned: Catherine de Medici, Diane de Poitiers and the Creation of a Regal Iconography

By Leila Molana-Allen. It seems evident that, while female patrons often did commission the same types of art as their male counterparts during the early modern period, their sex had a powerful influence on the approach they took when commissioning these works. However, I would argue that this meant their personal and political motivations featured… Continue reading A Woman Scorned: Catherine de Medici, Diane de Poitiers and the Creation of a Regal Iconography