Arts, Contemporary, Interviews

A Conversation With Playwright Flo Read

By Emily Oldham. Since Flo Read’s Twin Primes won Best Script and Best Production in the 2015 Oxford New Writing Festival, she has gone on to develop several more acclaimed plays. Her work has been performed both nationally and internationally, including at the Edinburgh Fringe 2015 and 2016. She recently graduated from Oxford University with… Continue reading A Conversation With Playwright Flo Read

16th century, Humanities

Elizabeth: The First Things to Remember

By Anna Simpson The reign of Elizabeth I was undeniably a politically tumultuous and dynamic one. Embroiled in romantic, diplomatic and bloody foreign battles, Elizabeth died leaving her successors to pick up the pieces of her debt-filled and heir-less legacy. It may therefore seem surprising that she continues to be celebrated in most modern day… Continue reading Elizabeth: The First Things to Remember

19th century, 20th century, Humanities

Beatrice Webb: Progressive Politics and a Pragmatic Outlook on War

By Alice Theobald Beatrice Webb – co-founder of the London School of Economics – had a notoriously pragmatic approach to social affairs, coining the term ‘collective bargaining’ to describe the relationship between employers and employees negotiating working conditions. Cousin to social philanthropist Charles Booth, Webb immersed herself in aiding his research on Victorian urban slums… Continue reading Beatrice Webb: Progressive Politics and a Pragmatic Outlook on War

20th century, Humanities

A Life Less Ordinary: Emmeline Pankhurst’s Fight for Equality

By Ellen Wright Emmeline Pankhurst’s life is largely studied in the context of the fight for women’s suffrage in the early 20th century; however, she in fact had a much wider spread of interests and campaigns. By defining Emmeline solely as the leader of the suffragette movement, we are limiting the ways in which she… Continue reading A Life Less Ordinary: Emmeline Pankhurst’s Fight for Equality

Uncategorized

The Role of Political Spouses – A Discussion

From: Bronwyn Stippa Sent: 20 July 2011 19:23 To: Jack Campbell Cc: bluestocking.editor@gmail.com Subject: RE: Bluestocking Discussion Concerning the question of whether spouses should matter: As far as I can tell there are two camps: One argues that politicians’ personal lives (including personal relationships) are irrelevant to their public work. If they do a good job,… Continue reading The Role of Political Spouses – A Discussion

Arts, Humanities, Medieval

Peace, Politics, Gender and God: Beowulf and the Women Of Early Medieval Europe

By Eleanor Franzen Beowulf is not what one might call a feminine poem. The women whose lives and sufferings are described within it are not the immediate focus. No one thinks of the agony of Hildeburh or the canny political maneuverings of Wealhtheow when they think of Beowulf. The Beowulf-poet, particularly in his exploitation and… Continue reading Peace, Politics, Gender and God: Beowulf and the Women Of Early Medieval Europe

16th century, Humanities

Women Historians and Female Kingship in Early Modern England

By Signy Gutnick Allen Jane. Edward. Mary. Elizabeth. By the end of Elizabeth I's reign the population of England was practically, if not philosophically or ideologically, very used to having a woman on the throne. However, what living under a female monarch for an Early Modern population was actually like, from how 'female kings' were… Continue reading Women Historians and Female Kingship in Early Modern England

16th century, Arts

A Woman Scorned: Catherine de Medici, Diane de Poitiers and the Creation of a Regal Iconography

By Leila Molana-Allen. It seems evident that, while female patrons often did commission the same types of art as their male counterparts during the early modern period, their sex had a powerful influence on the approach they took when commissioning these works. However, I would argue that this meant their personal and political motivations featured… Continue reading A Woman Scorned: Catherine de Medici, Diane de Poitiers and the Creation of a Regal Iconography