19th century, Arts

Where Loss Resides

The Relationship Between Space and Loneliness in the Poetry of Christina Rossetti By Mona Sakr and Ali Nihat Christina Rossetti (1830-1894) is perhaps best known for her religious poetry. And yet, her work is often an exploration of the ultimate loneliness of human existence, mourning the absence of all others, including God, in the innermost… Continue reading Where Loss Resides

20th century, Arts

Birth and Descent: An Intimate Critique of Loy’s Poem ‘Der Blinde Junge’

By Mona Sakr A short grapple with Google demonstrates that, if nothing else, Mina Loy has earned herself a phenomenally large set of labels. She was (according to the internet) a modernist, a postmodernist, a futurist, a conceptualist and a surrealist all at the same time. It sounds impressive. Confusing also, for I cannot seem… Continue reading Birth and Descent: An Intimate Critique of Loy’s Poem ‘Der Blinde Junge’

Arts, Classical/ Ancient

“Keep your whore with her wool baskets!”: Sulpicia answers back

By Susannah Darby Roman elegy was a very one-sided conversation. Male poets would write to women, both in praise, and in criticism, of them. Although they demanded that their girlfriends be “doctae puellae”, educated girls, and although Sappho was celebrated as the Ninth Muse, we rarely hear the other side of the story. Many, if… Continue reading “Keep your whore with her wool baskets!”: Sulpicia answers back