Contemporary, Interviews, Science

Project Juno: Trudy Coe and Women in Physics

Click here to read the extended version of this interview. Gaia Donati talks to Trudy Coe, Project Juno Officer in the Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 26th January 2011. I am very grateful to Carrie Leonard-McIntyre for putting me in touch with Trudy Coe, who is currently working for the Department of Physics at the University… Continue reading Project Juno: Trudy Coe and Women in Physics

20th century, Science

Irene Joliot-Curie: Pioneer of Atomic Science

By Harriet Teare Irene Joliot-Curie's success as a scientist, principally involved in continuing the investigation into artificial radiation, rivalled even that of her mother, Marie. This article intends to briefly explore some of the outstanding science that led this woman, as part of a collaboration of husband and wife, to some of the extraordinary findings… Continue reading Irene Joliot-Curie: Pioneer of Atomic Science

19th century, Science

Mary Fairfax Somerville: Queen of Nineteenth Century Science

By Lamorna Newcombe Fifteen year old Mary Fairfax was one day shown an intriguing problem in a ladies' fashion magazine at an Edinburgh tea-party. However, she was more fascinated by the code that the answer was presented in than the answer itself. At that time, little did she know that her interest in algebra would… Continue reading Mary Fairfax Somerville: Queen of Nineteenth Century Science

20th century, Science

Lise Meitner : The Nucleus of Fission

By Nicola Davies 'In terms of 19th century stereotypes or rhetorical idealizations, a woman scientist was a contradiction in terms... Women scientists were thus caught between two almost mutually exclusive stereotypes: as scientists, they were atypical women; as women they were unusual scientists.' Lise Meitner's name is to many an unfamiliar one, occasionally found somewhere… Continue reading Lise Meitner : The Nucleus of Fission

18th century, Science

Emilie du Chatelet: The Multi-Tasking Marquise

By Mohsin Khan Emilie du Chatelet, regarded for too long as a footnote of history being a mistress of Voltaire, was a driven and passionate physicist, mathematician and translator. She derived the equation for kinetic energy by studying the work of Leibniz and created the only existing French translation of Newton's Principia. Du Chatelet's scientific… Continue reading Emilie du Chatelet: The Multi-Tasking Marquise

20th century, Science

Jocelyn Bell and the Lighthouses of the Sky

By Maddie Geddes-Barton In 1967 Bell was working on her PhD in astronomical physics: the study of outer space. The specific aim of her research was to test a new radio telescope designed mainly by her supervisor Anthony Hewish. The Cavendish team of astronomers working on the project were specifically interested in searching for quasars.… Continue reading Jocelyn Bell and the Lighthouses of the Sky

Interviews

Project Juno: Trudy Coe and Women in Physics (interview)

Gaia Donati talks to Trudy Coe, Project Juno Officer – Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 26th January 2011. I am very grateful to Carrie Leonard-McIntyre for putting me in touch with Trudy Coe, who is currently working for the Department of Physics at the University of Oxford and whom I fondly thank for having… Continue reading Project Juno: Trudy Coe and Women in Physics (interview)