17th century, Humanities, Science

Counterpart Lives: Margaret Cavendish and Lady Anne Conway

By Alice Theobald Margaret Cavendish is chiefly remembered today for being the pioneer of the science-fiction genre with her innovative work The Blazing-World of 1666. However, she also wrote prolifically on political and philosophical matters, championing a pioneering materialism and progressive method of natural philosophy. Published in the same year as her fictional work, Cavendish’s… Continue reading Counterpart Lives: Margaret Cavendish and Lady Anne Conway

Humanities, Interviews

Interview with Professor Martha Nussbaum

Alice Theobald interviews Martha Nussbaum American Philosopher Martha Nussbaum is the current Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics, appointed in the Law School and the Philosophy Department at the University of Chicago.  She has previously taught at Harvard, Brown and Oxford. She has also chaired the Committee on the Status of Women,… Continue reading Interview with Professor Martha Nussbaum

20th century, Arts

The Real and the Good: Iris Murdoch’s Philosophy in Fiction An examination of The Bell

By Minocher Dinshaw Iris Murdoch is now best known to us as a novelist; it is easy to forget that her undergraduate study at Oxford was in classics, her postgraduate studentship at Cambridge was in philosophy, and that during her time as a Fellow at St. Anne's (1948-1963) she also taught the subject. Her first… Continue reading The Real and the Good: Iris Murdoch’s Philosophy in Fiction An examination of The Bell

17th century, Arts, Science

“An Inexhaustible Treasure of Fancy”: Thomas Sprat, Margaret Cavendish and Aphra Behn.

By Aime Williams During the mid- seventeenth century, there arose a new strand of philosophical thinking -- the premise of which was that truth had been encoded into the world by God through his creation. The best way to find these truths, therefore, was to examine the world via observation and the senses. The central text… Continue reading “An Inexhaustible Treasure of Fancy”: Thomas Sprat, Margaret Cavendish and Aphra Behn.

Humanities, Medieval

Wholly Guilty and Wholly Innocent: Heloise, Sin and Intention

By Diana Jeske   During her lifetime and beyond, Heloise captured hearts. Her intellectual brilliance in life attracted the love of the most famous philosopher of the day, Peter Abelard, and the passion revealed in her later letters to him has captivated scholars, from Petrarch to twenty-first century academics, ever since. Born, most likely, in… Continue reading Wholly Guilty and Wholly Innocent: Heloise, Sin and Intention

20th century, Humanities

Iris Marion Young : A ‘new look’ female bodily experience

By Lauren Steyn Throughout history, the image of women has undeniably been that of 'the Other'; with the female form long associated with fragility, sex, birth, age and flesh. Iris Marion Young (1949-2006), a leading political philosopher and feminist theorist, explored the female body from an experiential point of view and so sought to fill… Continue reading Iris Marion Young : A ‘new look’ female bodily experience

18th century, Science

Emilie du Chatelet: The Multi-Tasking Marquise

By Mohsin Khan Emilie du Chatelet, regarded for too long as a footnote of history being a mistress of Voltaire, was a driven and passionate physicist, mathematician and translator. She derived the equation for kinetic energy by studying the work of Leibniz and created the only existing French translation of Newton's Principia. Du Chatelet's scientific… Continue reading Emilie du Chatelet: The Multi-Tasking Marquise

20th century, Contemporary, Humanities

Morality and Art: the fiction of inescapability

By Clare Barnard Philippa Foot’s academic career has spanned arguably the most changeable time of the twentieth century. She has now returned to Oxford, after being made Griffin Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles in 1991. Foot began her studies in a very different world as a PPE student at… Continue reading Morality and Art: the fiction of inescapability