18th century, 19th century, Arts

Mary Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft: A Sublime Lineage

In challenging at once the prevailing political attitudes of the time, and the literary ones, Wollstonecraft lays a foundation for her daughter, Mary Shelley, to continue these efforts. Wollstonecraft was arguing for a sense of radical inclusion, that by ironing out the divisions between men and women mankind might become, in her words, ‘more wise and virtuous’, with a greater sense of equality. Wollstonecraft died giving birth to her daughter, Mary, a fact which haunted Shelley throughout her life.

18th century, Arts

‘Nature is the nurse of sentiment’: Mary Wollstonecraft’s Scandinavian Travelogue

By Alice Theobald So much more than an exercise in travel writing, Mary Wollstonecraft’s Letters Written During a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark accounts her unrequited love for her supposed partner, Gilbert Imlay. Reading more like a tragedy in epistolary form, Wollstonecraft’s account of the landscape is interwoven with personal reflections on her… Continue reading ‘Nature is the nurse of sentiment’: Mary Wollstonecraft’s Scandinavian Travelogue