Arts

Bluestocking Recommends…Best Films Directed by Women

Sophie Dowle has compiled a (very loosely ranked) list of great films directed by great women. What are your favourites? Persepolis - Marjane Satrapi (and Vincent Paronnaud) [France/Iran/USA, 2007] A classic, and a must-watch for teenagers searching for their identity. This stunning animation makes you laugh and cry as you follow Marjane’s journey to adulthood via… Continue reading Bluestocking Recommends…Best Films Directed by Women

20th century, Science

Emmy Noether

'The most significant creative mathematical genius thus far produced since the higher education of women began’ By Jessica Hanzlik The story of Amalie “Emmy” Noether parallels that of countless women, who, throughout generations and across cultures, were denied access to knowledge solely on the basis of their sex.  Noether, however, leaves behind her not just… Continue reading Emmy Noether

20th century, Humanities

Appraising and Reappraising the Aviator Hanna Reitsch

By James Maclaine In her autobiography Fliegen, mein Leben Hanna Reitsch wrote that, 'at great altitudes the airman feels close to God.' With these words she captured the privilege that is the pilot's and the otherness that has caused those exemplary in the world of aviation to be lauded and recorded. Although traditionally a male… Continue reading Appraising and Reappraising the Aviator Hanna Reitsch

20th century, Arts

‘A Shadow Figure of the Bauhaus’: Anni Albers and Textile Art

By Maria Paz Mendes Hodes Rising from the ashes of a defeated Germany, the Bauhaus, founded by Walter Gropius in Weimar in 1919, took a mere twelve years to create the aesthetic zeitgeist of the 20th century. Even today, as the aggressively fanciful shapes of postmodern architecture emerge as the look of the future, when… Continue reading ‘A Shadow Figure of the Bauhaus’: Anni Albers and Textile Art

19th century, Arts

From Private to Public: The Musical Lives of Fanny Hensel and Clara Schumann

By Marissa Pueschel Two of the most outstanding female composers of the nineteenth century were Felix Mendelssohn's sister Fanny Hensel and Robert Schumann's wife Clara. While their talents were respected by their male relatives, the two women responded to the challenges of breaking into the male-dominated world of music in different ways. While Hensel found… Continue reading From Private to Public: The Musical Lives of Fanny Hensel and Clara Schumann

20th century, Arts

Ingeborg Bachmann’s Malina: The (im)Possibility of Writing the Female Self

By Alexandra Hills The cultic tradition of German literary scholarship overlooks its few female exponents shadowed by inescapable male heavyweights of Germanistik. To toe the standard line, women in German literature are often limited to playing a supporting role to the eminent male genius whose ineluctable influence decides their fate, Goethe's Gretchen for example. Ingeborg… Continue reading Ingeborg Bachmann’s Malina: The (im)Possibility of Writing the Female Self

20th century, Arts

Gabriele Münter: The Yellow House and Boating

By Maria Villalonga Gabriele Münter’s role in the History of Art is no longer limited to her partnership with Wassily Kandinsky: she is now accepted as an artist in her own right. Das Gelbe Haus and Boating exemplify Münter’s contribution to Art, reflecting both her style and her most intimate concerns. The link between Münter’s… Continue reading Gabriele Münter: The Yellow House and Boating

20th century, Humanities

“At the beginning there was the deed.” Rosa Luxemburg and the Theory of Mass Strike

By Hannah Kuchler   Polish revolutionary Rosa Luxemburg lived her life by this motto, organising, protesting and campaigning for revolution. Not content with founding and leading the Polish Social Democratic party she moved to Germany to be at the industrial heartland of Europe. Fiercely opposed to German militarism, she campaigned for a general strike to… Continue reading “At the beginning there was the deed.” Rosa Luxemburg and the Theory of Mass Strike