Arts

Bluestocking Recommends…Best Films Directed by Women

Sophie Dowle has compiled a (very loosely ranked) list of great films directed by great women. What are your favourites? Persepolis - Marjane Satrapi (and Vincent Paronnaud) [France/Iran/USA, 2007] A classic, and a must-watch for teenagers searching for their identity. This stunning animation makes you laugh and cry as you follow Marjane’s journey to adulthood via… Continue reading Bluestocking Recommends…Best Films Directed by Women

18th century, Humanities

Louise Dupin: Bluestocking’s 18th Century Predecessor

By Sophie Dowle. Long before Bluestocking Journal was publishing articles on great women, Louise Marie-Madeleine Dupin (1706-99), a French saloniste, compiled and began writing a book on the history of women: Ouvrage sur les femmes. Unfortunately, this work was never fully completed, and the many boxes of notes, drafts and copies that Madame Dupin had… Continue reading Louise Dupin: Bluestocking’s 18th Century Predecessor

19th century, Arts

Madame de Staël – Literature, Society and “Woman”

By Helen Craske “Un homme doit savoir braver l’opinion; une femme s’y soumettre” [Delphine] (“A man must know how to defy opinion; a woman, how to obey it.”[1]) Madame de Staël has been called ‘one of the most important women in history’ (Bowman, in Dixon, 2009, p.9), and this is for her impact over politics,… Continue reading Madame de Staël – Literature, Society and “Woman”

20th century, Arts

Gertrude Stein

By Siobhan Fenton Behind every great man is a great woman. The shallow reality of this phrase is perhaps never so brilliantly exposed than through the life of Gertrude Stein, who was not merely behind one great man, but several geniuses: Picasso, Hemmingway, Matisse and Cezanne. Stein, the American art collector and modern writer, is… Continue reading Gertrude Stein

16th century, Arts

A Woman Scorned: Catherine de Medici, Diane de Poitiers and the Creation of a Regal Iconography

By Leila Molana-Allen. It seems evident that, while female patrons often did commission the same types of art as their male counterparts during the early modern period, their sex had a powerful influence on the approach they took when commissioning these works. However, I would argue that this meant their personal and political motivations featured… Continue reading A Woman Scorned: Catherine de Medici, Diane de Poitiers and the Creation of a Regal Iconography

20th century, Humanities

The Second Sex

By EJ Tritton Simone de Beauvoir has often been described as the 'mother' of modern feminism, and her most famous work, Le Deuxieme Sexe (published in 1949) as its 'Bible'. Yet 'Feminism' is a remarkably ambiguous concept. Wikipedia defines it as "a number of movements, theories and philosophies that are concerned with issues of gender… Continue reading The Second Sex

18th century, Science

Emilie du Chatelet: The Multi-Tasking Marquise

By Mohsin Khan Emilie du Chatelet, regarded for too long as a footnote of history being a mistress of Voltaire, was a driven and passionate physicist, mathematician and translator. She derived the equation for kinetic energy by studying the work of Leibniz and created the only existing French translation of Newton's Principia. Du Chatelet's scientific… Continue reading Emilie du Chatelet: The Multi-Tasking Marquise

18th century, Humanities

Olympe de Gouges and the Rights of Woman

By Lloyd Lewis In March 2004, in a modest ceremony followed by a buffet, a previously unnamed crossroads in Paris was named 'Place Olympe de Gouges'. Throughout France, a small but growing number of roads bear the same name; all were inaugurated within the last thirty years, Gouges died in 1793. The campaign to rehabilitate… Continue reading Olympe de Gouges and the Rights of Woman