20th century, Arts

Georgia O’Keeffe at the Tate Modern

By Ellen Pasternack and Emily Oldham.   Many people think of Georgia O’Keeffe as ‘that artist who paints flowers to look like vulvas’. Judy Chicago and others pick out her 1923 ‘Grey Lines With Black, Blue and Yellow’ as particularly yonic, for example. So we were surprised to learn that not only was this resemblance… Continue reading Georgia O’Keeffe at the Tate Modern

19th century, Arts

Registering Desire: Spousal and Appetitive Imagery in the Religious and Devotional Poetry of Christina Rossetti

By Alice Theobald In a period noted for its ostensible conservatism and censorship of linguistic taboos, Christina Rossetti is often taken as paradigmatic of this aversion towards the open expression of sensuality and female sensation. However, her religious poetry in fact displays a marked tendency towards images of physical desire, appropriating the language of erotic… Continue reading Registering Desire: Spousal and Appetitive Imagery in the Religious and Devotional Poetry of Christina Rossetti

17th century, Arts

Friendship in Emblem: Negotiating Gender and Sexuality in the Poetry of Katherine Philips

By Mimi Goodall It is fascinating to analyse the ways in which female writers, working within a predominantly male tradition, negotiate their gender, femininity and sexuality in their writing. In women’s writing, the “female” shifts from existing as written object to active creator of the text. As they subvert or adapt traditional representations of women… Continue reading Friendship in Emblem: Negotiating Gender and Sexuality in the Poetry of Katherine Philips

Arts, Classical/ Ancient

“Keep your whore with her wool baskets!”: Sulpicia answers back

By Susannah Darby Roman elegy was a very one-sided conversation. Male poets would write to women, both in praise, and in criticism, of them. Although they demanded that their girlfriends be “doctae puellae”, educated girls, and although Sappho was celebrated as the Ninth Muse, we rarely hear the other side of the story. Many, if… Continue reading “Keep your whore with her wool baskets!”: Sulpicia answers back