18th century, Humanities

Striking Out New Paths: Late Eighteenth Century Women Travel Writers and ‘Philosophic Geography’

By Will Tullett, “... the world should see, to how much better purpose the LADIES travel than their LORDS; and that, whilst it is surfeited with Male-Travels, all in the same tone, and stuft with the same trifles; a lady has the skill to strike out a new path, and to embellish a worn-out subject,… Continue reading Striking Out New Paths: Late Eighteenth Century Women Travel Writers and ‘Philosophic Geography’

18th century, Arts

Public and Private, Real and Fictional: The Rise of Women’s Letter-Writing in the Eighteenth Century

By Tess Somervell.During the eighteenth century, thanks to the establishment of the post office in 1660, a rise in literacy, and an ascendant ‘middle class’, letter-writing became an increasingly common pastime for men and women. The letter became a form both of private communication and of public expression, in which women were expected not only… Continue reading Public and Private, Real and Fictional: The Rise of Women’s Letter-Writing in the Eighteenth Century

18th century, 20th century, Arts

‘Laetitia Pilkington’ by Virginia Woolf

By Virginia Woolf This article was first published Woolf's 'The Common Reader' in 1925. Let us bother the librarian once again. Let us ask him to reach down, dust, and hand over to us that little brown book over there, the Memoirs of Mrs. Pilkington, three volumes bound in one, printed by Peter Hoey in… Continue reading ‘Laetitia Pilkington’ by Virginia Woolf

18th century, Arts

Mary Montagu

By Ella Harris Lady Mary Montagu (1689-1762), court beauty, wife of the British Ambassador to Istanbul and prolific letter-writer, was the first major female travel writer of her time. She was a correspondent with Alexander Pope, knew and was disliked by Horace Walpole, and introduced the Turkish, then Ottoman, method of inoculation to Britain. Often… Continue reading Mary Montagu

Humanities, Medieval

Wholly Guilty and Wholly Innocent: Heloise, Sin and Intention

By Diana Jeske   During her lifetime and beyond, Heloise captured hearts. Her intellectual brilliance in life attracted the love of the most famous philosopher of the day, Peter Abelard, and the passion revealed in her later letters to him has captivated scholars, from Petrarch to twenty-first century academics, ever since. Born, most likely, in… Continue reading Wholly Guilty and Wholly Innocent: Heloise, Sin and Intention

Humanities, Medieval

Commitment to poverty and commitment to Christ: The spirituality of Saint Clare as revealed in her letters to Agnes of Prague

By Charlotte King Saint Clare was born in the small northern Italian town of Assisi in 1194 to a noble, wealthy family. When she was 18 she resisted pressure from her family to marry and secretly ran away to join St Francis and his followers. She was unable to follow the itinerant lifestyle of the… Continue reading Commitment to poverty and commitment to Christ: The spirituality of Saint Clare as revealed in her letters to Agnes of Prague