20th century, Arts

Georgia O’Keeffe at the Tate Modern

By Ellen Pasternack and Emily Oldham.   Many people think of Georgia O’Keeffe as ‘that artist who paints flowers to look like vulvas’. Judy Chicago and others pick out her 1923 ‘Grey Lines With Black, Blue and Yellow’ as particularly yonic, for example. So we were surprised to learn that not only was this resemblance… Continue reading Georgia O’Keeffe at the Tate Modern

16th century, Arts

A Renaissance Flâneur: Isabella Whitney’s willed urban self

By Alice Theobald In executing a fictional will, sixteenth-century poet Isabella Whitney not only presented a defence of women's legal legitimacy but also externalised herself into the city, channelling her personal impulses into the physical structures and material goods of her London. However, rather than reducing herself to a commodity, she uses her distribution of… Continue reading A Renaissance Flâneur: Isabella Whitney’s willed urban self

20th century, Arts

Georgia O’Keeffe and Virginia Woolf

By Claire Thomas The closest that the American painter Georgia O'Keeffe and the English writer Virginia Woolf physically came was in the pages of the May 1925 volume of the modernist literary magazine, The Dial. Images of O'Keeffe's twin works, The Flagpole, preface Woolf's The Lives of the Obscure, an essay on the unexpected profundity… Continue reading Georgia O’Keeffe and Virginia Woolf