19th century, Arts

An Unwilling Empress: Sisi through the lens of her poetry and the portraits of Franz Xaver Winterhalter

By Alice Theobald Termed by Brigitte Hamann ‘a woman who refused to behave according to her rank’, Empress Sisi’s somewhat playful audacity was always at odds with the official role of Empress of Austria she assumed at the tender age of sixteen. Her childhood spent at Possenhofen Castle fostered an unrestrained environment with few rules… Continue reading An Unwilling Empress: Sisi through the lens of her poetry and the portraits of Franz Xaver Winterhalter

20th century, Arts

Hedy Lamarr

How one of the stars of Hollywood’s Golden Age became the grandmother of modern wireless technology By Sarah Illingworth.   Having come to the attention of Hollywood producers after starring in the first non-pornographic movie to portray sexual intercourse and the female orgasm, Hedy Lamarr went on to co-invent an early form of spread spectrum… Continue reading Hedy Lamarr

20th century, Science

Lise Meitner : The Nucleus of Fission

By Nicola Davies 'In terms of 19th century stereotypes or rhetorical idealizations, a woman scientist was a contradiction in terms... Women scientists were thus caught between two almost mutually exclusive stereotypes: as scientists, they were atypical women; as women they were unusual scientists.' Lise Meitner's name is to many an unfamiliar one, occasionally found somewhere… Continue reading Lise Meitner : The Nucleus of Fission

20th century, Arts

Birth and Descent: An Intimate Critique of Loy’s Poem ‘Der Blinde Junge’

By Mona Sakr A short grapple with Google demonstrates that, if nothing else, Mina Loy has earned herself a phenomenally large set of labels. She was (according to the internet) a modernist, a postmodernist, a futurist, a conceptualist and a surrealist all at the same time. It sounds impressive. Confusing also, for I cannot seem… Continue reading Birth and Descent: An Intimate Critique of Loy’s Poem ‘Der Blinde Junge’