20th century, Arts

Georgia O’Keeffe at the Tate Modern

By Ellen Pasternack and Emily Oldham.   Many people think of Georgia O’Keeffe as ‘that artist who paints flowers to look like vulvas’. Judy Chicago and others pick out her 1923 ‘Grey Lines With Black, Blue and Yellow’ as particularly yonic, for example. So we were surprised to learn that not only was this resemblance… Continue reading Georgia O’Keeffe at the Tate Modern

Arts, Contemporary

Doris Salcedo’s Untitleds

By Emily Oldham. Picture a room: spacious, with blank-white walls, it seems the height of impersonality. From this coldness loom dozens of furniture pieces, every crevice suffused by cement, figures of unapologetically brutal beauty. Some contain embedded hair, bone and even clothing. The absence of a body becomes starkly physical; concrete seeps into every inch of… Continue reading Doris Salcedo’s Untitleds

Arts, Interviews

An Interview with Lalla Essaydi

By Sophie Dowle. Lalla Essaydi is an influential Moroccan-American artist, whose uncompromising portrayals of women have sent waves across the art world. Bold, brave and unafraid to make frank and honest statements regarding gender and the Middle East, Essaydi challenges the tropes of Orientalism head-on in her work. When I spoke to her, her passion… Continue reading An Interview with Lalla Essaydi

19th century, Arts

An Unwilling Empress: Sisi through the lens of her poetry and the portraits of Franz Xaver Winterhalter

By Alice Theobald Termed by Brigitte Hamann ‘a woman who refused to behave according to her rank’, Empress Sisi’s somewhat playful audacity was always at odds with the official role of Empress of Austria she assumed at the tender age of sixteen. Her childhood spent at Possenhofen Castle fostered an unrestrained environment with few rules… Continue reading An Unwilling Empress: Sisi through the lens of her poetry and the portraits of Franz Xaver Winterhalter

20th century, Arts

Silent Witnesses: The Art of Frauke Eigen and Jenny Stolzenberg

 by Hannah Lee Walk into the Imperial War Museum’s current exhibition on women war artists and you are greeted by the determined face of Ruby Loftus engaged in the expert task of screwing a breech ring. The portrait was painted in 1943, in the gun factory where she worked, by the war artist Laura Knight.… Continue reading Silent Witnesses: The Art of Frauke Eigen and Jenny Stolzenberg

19th century, Arts

Rossetti’s Other Woman: The silent contribution of models and muses

By Rebekah Lee.The concluding decades of the Nineteenth century marked a series of major developments for the growing political voice of English women. Events such as the female-led Campaign Against the Contagious Diseases Acts and the establishment of the National Union of Women’s Suffrage in 1897 provided ample evidence to suggest the emergence of a… Continue reading Rossetti’s Other Woman: The silent contribution of models and muses

16th century, Arts

A Woman Scorned: Catherine de Medici, Diane de Poitiers and the Creation of a Regal Iconography

By Leila Molana-Allen. It seems evident that, while female patrons often did commission the same types of art as their male counterparts during the early modern period, their sex had a powerful influence on the approach they took when commissioning these works. However, I would argue that this meant their personal and political motivations featured… Continue reading A Woman Scorned: Catherine de Medici, Diane de Poitiers and the Creation of a Regal Iconography

20th century, Arts

‘A Shadow Figure of the Bauhaus’: Anni Albers and Textile Art

By Maria Paz Mendes Hodes Rising from the ashes of a defeated Germany, the Bauhaus, founded by Walter Gropius in Weimar in 1919, took a mere twelve years to create the aesthetic zeitgeist of the 20th century. Even today, as the aggressively fanciful shapes of postmodern architecture emerge as the look of the future, when… Continue reading ‘A Shadow Figure of the Bauhaus’: Anni Albers and Textile Art

20th century, Arts

Georgia O’Keeffe and Virginia Woolf

By Claire Thomas The closest that the American painter Georgia O'Keeffe and the English writer Virginia Woolf physically came was in the pages of the May 1925 volume of the modernist literary magazine, The Dial. Images of O'Keeffe's twin works, The Flagpole, preface Woolf's The Lives of the Obscure, an essay on the unexpected profundity… Continue reading Georgia O’Keeffe and Virginia Woolf

20th century, Arts

The Art of Being Zelda

By Lindsey Meyers Zelda Fitzgerald is often cast in the reflected light of her husband, the American writer F. Scott Fitzgerald. Where he is a celebrated literary figure, she is his 'muse'. And where his work is said to capture the spirit of the Jazz Age, she is often objectified as a flapper, that is,… Continue reading The Art of Being Zelda