20th century, Arts

Golden Notebook, golden ladies? Image and self-image in Doris Lessing’s unwilling ’feminist Bible’.

By Monika Kreile That heroines of The Golden Notebook (first published in 1962i) are not paradigms of ’liberated’ women is an often-stated fact in criticisms of the novel. However, to ponder whether, and to what extent, the weaknesses of her heroines are intentionally inserted by Lessing or reflect Lessing's own state of feminist (un)consciousness is… Continue reading Golden Notebook, golden ladies? Image and self-image in Doris Lessing’s unwilling ’feminist Bible’.

19th century, Humanities

A Life’s Work: Minnie James and Images of the Woman Librarian

By Mona Sakr Minnie Stewart Rhodes James (1865 – 1903) was appointed Head Librarian in the People’s Palace Library, East London in 1889. She was a respected member of the Library Association, and presented a number of papers to the Association, some of which discussed opportunities for women to take up paid positions in libraries.… Continue reading A Life’s Work: Minnie James and Images of the Woman Librarian

19th century, Arts, Humanities

Education and Social Change in George Eliot’s Middlemarch

By M. S. Lovelace The rapid educational and social developments of the late 19th century were underpinned not just by policy and public documentation but by the 'unrecorded but resourceful improvisations’ (Donald, 1992, p. 2) of the everyday. The latter occur in the physical spaces in which education operates and these spaces and improvisations can… Continue reading Education and Social Change in George Eliot’s Middlemarch

18th century, 20th century, Arts

‘Laetitia Pilkington’ by Virginia Woolf

By Virginia Woolf This article was first published Woolf's 'The Common Reader' in 1925. Let us bother the librarian once again. Let us ask him to reach down, dust, and hand over to us that little brown book over there, the Memoirs of Mrs. Pilkington, three volumes bound in one, printed by Peter Hoey in… Continue reading ‘Laetitia Pilkington’ by Virginia Woolf

20th century, Contemporary, Humanities

Elinor Ostrom and Economic Governance

By Eleanor Connolly. This year Elinor Ostrom became the first ever female recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences. Ostrom's win was revolutionary for her gender, but more importantly because the research she was awarded for has overturned commonly held assumptions about basic human economic interaction. The prize was shared Oliver E. Williamson for… Continue reading Elinor Ostrom and Economic Governance

Arts, Contemporary

Kate Mosse: the other Kate

By Clarissa Pabi. Kate Mosse may not canter down catwalks like the other Kate, but she is a model of great importance nonetheless.  A BBC broadcaster, best-selling author, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, co-founder of the “Orange Prize for Fiction” and the “Chichester Writing Festival”, Kate’s contributions to the arts go on ad infinitum. … Continue reading Kate Mosse: the other Kate

20th century, Arts

The Real and the Good: Iris Murdoch’s Philosophy in Fiction An examination of The Bell

By Minocher Dinshaw Iris Murdoch is now best known to us as a novelist; it is easy to forget that her undergraduate study at Oxford was in classics, her postgraduate studentship at Cambridge was in philosophy, and that during her time as a Fellow at St. Anne's (1948-1963) she also taught the subject. Her first… Continue reading The Real and the Good: Iris Murdoch’s Philosophy in Fiction An examination of The Bell

18th century, Arts

Mary Montagu

By Ella Harris Lady Mary Montagu (1689-1762), court beauty, wife of the British Ambassador to Istanbul and prolific letter-writer, was the first major female travel writer of her time. She was a correspondent with Alexander Pope, knew and was disliked by Horace Walpole, and introduced the Turkish, then Ottoman, method of inoculation to Britain. Often… Continue reading Mary Montagu

Humanities, Medieval

Saint Clare of Assisi – living by the Rule

By Raffaella Tommassi. Clare of Assisi can be seen as one of the most influential women in the Middle Ages, at the forefront of the fight to ensure a true female religious mendicancy. Indeed, Pope Innocent IV agreed with me, stopping the Friars Minor from saying the office of the dead during her funeral and… Continue reading Saint Clare of Assisi – living by the Rule

16th century, Humanities

Women Historians and Female Kingship in Early Modern England

By Signy Gutnick Allen Jane. Edward. Mary. Elizabeth. By the end of Elizabeth I's reign the population of England was practically, if not philosophically or ideologically, very used to having a woman on the throne. However, what living under a female monarch for an Early Modern population was actually like, from how 'female kings' were… Continue reading Women Historians and Female Kingship in Early Modern England