Category Archives: Issue Seven

Elinor Ostrom and Economic Governance

By Eleanor Connolly. This year Elinor Ostrom became the first ever female recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences. Ostrom’s win was revolutionary for her gender, but more importantly because the research she was awarded for has overturned commonly … Continue reading

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Kate Mosse: the other Kate

By Clarissa Pabi. Kate Mosse may not canter down catwalks like the other Kate, but she is a model of great importance nonetheless.  A BBC broadcaster, best-selling author, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, co-founder of the “Orange Prize for … Continue reading

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The Real and the Good: Iris Murdoch’s Philosophy in Fiction An examination of The Bell

By Minocher Dinshaw Iris Murdoch is now best known to us as a novelist; it is easy to forget that her undergraduate study at Oxford was in classics, her postgraduate studentship at Cambridge was in philosophy, and that during her … Continue reading

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Mary Montagu

By Ella Harris Lady Mary Montagu (1689-1762), court beauty, wife of the British Ambassador to Istanbul and prolific letter-writer, was the first major female travel writer of her time. She was a correspondent with Alexander Pope, knew and was disliked … Continue reading

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Saint Clare of Assisi – living by the Rule

Raffaella Tommassi Clare of Assisi can be seen as one of the most influential women in the Middle Ages, at the forefront of the fight to ensure a true female religious mendicancy. Indeed, Pope Innocent IV agreed with me, stopping … Continue reading

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Women Historians and Female Kingship in Early Modern England

By Signy Gutnick Allen Jane. Edward. Mary. Elizabeth. By the end of Elizabeth I’s reign the population of England was practically, if not philosophically or ideologically, very used to having a woman on the throne. However, what living under a … Continue reading

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“An Inexhaustible Treasure of Fancy”: Thomas Sprat, Margaret Cavendish and Aphra Behn.

By Aime Williams During the mid- seventeenth century, there arose a new strand of philosophical thinking — the premise of which was that truth had been encoded into the world by God through his creation. The best way to find … Continue reading

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“I say someone in another time will remember us.”

By Rhiannon Garth Jones and Tom Dean For over three thousand years, poetry has been a way to achieve immortality, both for the poet and the subject, making permanent the passing lives of humans. This fragment from Sappho expresses, whether … Continue reading

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‘If I have any goal in fashion, it is to help women express their strength.’ – Diane von Fürstenberg

By Rosie Pigott Perhaps one the most inspiring women in the history of fashion is Diane von Fürstenberg: creative designer, powerful entrepreneur and a firm believer in female independence. In 1976 she was described by Newsweek as the ‘new icon … Continue reading

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Jane Goodall

By Harriet Dalrymple Jane Goodall is one of the most famous, celebrated and inspirational figures in Science today, however it is not only her academic work that has made her so successful. Few scientists have the charisma needed to entertain … Continue reading

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